Changes between Version 26 and Version 27 of InstallationGuidelines/VirtualMachine


Ignore:
Timestamp:
11/11/11 09:45:40 (10 years ago)
Author:
Pat Tressel
Comment:

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  • InstallationGuidelines/VirtualMachine

    v26 v27  
    22= Installation Guidelines: Virtual Machine =
    33
    4 The most convenient way to get up and running is to use a pre-configured development kit -- a complete operating system that's been set up to include all the required code and tools, and saved as an image of the system's disk -- and run this "virtual system" (sometimes called an "appliance") in a "virtual machine" (VM). The virtual machine runs as an application on your machine -- the "host" machine -- and emulates a separate computer -- the "guest" machine. You won't have to install anything but the virtual machine directly on your system. (We're including the official virtual machine jargon in case you need to read virtual machine documentation.)
     4The most convenient way to get up and running is to use a pre-configured development kit -- a complete operating system that's been set up to include all the required code and tools, and saved as an image of the system's disk -- and run this "virtual system" (sometimes called an "appliance") in a "virtual machine" (VM). The virtual machine runs as an application on your machine -- the "host" machine -- and emulates a separate computer -- the "guest" machine. You won't have to install anything but the virtual machine directly on your system. (We're including the official virtual machine jargon in case you need to read virtual machine documentation. We'll use "VM" to refer to the guest virtual machine. The virtual machine "manager" will be the tool that is used to configure and start your VM.)
    55
    66== Get the Sahana Eden development kit image ==
     
    2424== Import the image into the virtual machine ==
    2525
    26  * Start !VirtualBox (or let the installer start it).
     26 * Start !VirtualBox Manager (or let the installer start it).
    2727
    28  * Give !VirtualBox the image to run:
     28 * Give !VirtualBox Manager the image to run:
    2929  * Select File -> Import Appliance.
    3030  * Click the Choose button. Navigate into the Eden Dev Env directory and select the .ovf file).
     
    3535== Start the virtual machine ==
    3636
    37 On the left side of the !VirtualBox GUI, you should see your new "Eden Dev Env" virtual machine.
     37On the left side of the !VirtualBox Manager GUI, you should see your new "Eden Dev Env" virtual machine.
    3838
    3939 * Click the virtual machine entry to select it.
    40  * Click Start (on the !VirtualBox menu bar).
     40 * Click Start (on the !VirtualBox Manager menu bar).
    4141 * You may get several popups telling you that the VM is going to "capture" your mouse and keyboard, and the "host key" to press to free them up. Remember which one it is. (This is only needed temporarily -- mouse sharing issues get fixed later.) Click Ok to the popups.
    4242 * You'll see a box asking you to enter a new "root" password. Click the mouse on the virtual machine window to give it focus. That will get you another popup telling you to let the VM "capture" your mouse. Click Ok. Your mouse pointer will disappear.
     
    5757== Connect to the network ==
    5858
    59 Next tell the VM about your machine's network interface, so the guest can get to the network. There are two options for having the host and guest share the physical interface, NAT or bridged. NAT is less obtrusive and simpler to set up, but bridged provides more capability to the guest. See this discussion of the '''[http://www.virtualbox.org/manual/ch06.html differences between NAT and bridged modes]'''. This shows NAT setup:
     59Next tell the VM about your machine's network interface, so the guest can get to the network. There are two options for having the host and guest share the physical interface, NAT or bridged. NAT is less obtrusive but bridged provides more capability to the guest. See this discussion of the '''[http://www.virtualbox.org/manual/ch06.html differences between NAT and bridged modes]'''. This shows bridged setup (because everyone who we know who is using VirtualBox is using bridged networking...):
    6060
    61  * Scroll down on the right side until you see Network -- click that.
    62  * Select the appropriate network interface (NIC), e.g. switch to wireless if that's what you're using. (Keep this setting in mind -- you may need to change it if you sometimes use a wired network, and sometimes wireless.)
    63  * Select NAT mode.
     61 * Scroll down on the right side of !VirtualBox Manager until you see Network -- click that.
     62 * If no adapters are enabled, enable adapter 1.
     63 * For "Attached to" select "Bridged Adapter".
     64 * Under that, for "Name", select the appropriate network interface, e.g. wireless if that's what you're using. (Keep this setting in mind -- you may need to change it if you sometimes use a wired network, and sometimes wireless.)
    6465
    6566== Install the "guest additions" ==
    66 ''Coming soon...''
     67
     68The "guest additions" kit makes sharing the mouse and keyboard between host and guest more natural, and allows a larger screen size for the guest.
     69
     70 * On the VM window menu: Devices -> Install Guest Additions... (This inserts a virtual CD-ROM with the guest additions installer in the virtual drive.)
     71 * Inside the VM window, start a terminal (double-click the LXTerminal icon). The following commands use "sudo" to execute privileged commands. The first use will ask you to enter your password -- that's the ''dev'' account password. Type:[[br]]
     72   {{{sudo mkdir /mnt/cdrom
     73sudo mount -t iso9660 -r /dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom
     74cd /mnt/cdrom
     75sudo ./VBoxLinuxAdditions.run}}}
    6776
    6877== Configure the guest system ==